How to Use a Notebook to Reach Your Writing Goals

First let me introduce you to my friend. FRED is the Folder for Reaching the End of your Draft. It’s an analog tool I use to keep track of my daily writing. It’s been downloaded thousands of times and is the best accountability tool I’ve ever used.

So, when I found this notebook and realized that it was essentially not only a full year FRED, but could also hold the story notes for a novel, I bought it. And it’s awesome!

The notebook is the Erin Condren Monthly Planner. It’s a lined notebook with a monthly calendar in the front.

I made you this quick video showing you how I have my annual FRED set up.

The notebook is available here.

When you get to the site, first sign up to get your $10 discount.

Then click “Planners & Books” and then “Monthly Planners.”

As I’m writing this, this notebook is HALF OFF, so hurry and jump on that.

Here are some pictures:

Very writerly cover!

Monthly calendar. To use it like a FRED, just give yourself a sticker everyday that you meet your writing goal. These boxes are big enough to make note of things like goals and deadlines if you want to.

The rest of the planner is just a lined notebook. I have the first few pages set up as a log, which is the second part of the FRED. There’s one page per month. Every day I can just write the date and what work I did that day. It helps me to feel professional. It’s visual proof of how hard I’m working, which frankly, sometimes I really need.

And then the rest of the lined pages, I’m really excited about. It’s just the right size to use to plan a novel using The Plotting Workshop. The story I’m writing right now, I already plotted in another notebook, but in a month or two I’ll be ready to start working on the next story and I’m going to just plan it right in here.

The paper is high quality and nice to write on, by the way.

Okay, also, I made this little printable PDF thing for you. You can print it, use double-sided tape to stick the two sides together, then laminate it. I tell my printer to print it in A5 size. The lamination makes it so that you can use a dry erase marker (or wet erase, so it won’t smear. That’s what I do.) to keep track of your writing progress.

I use mine as a bookmark.

One side has a sort of bar chart thing you can fill in for a week. (Make sure the plastic is totally dry after you clean it before you write on it, or you get wonky letters!)

And the other side has a chart where you can write down your word count everyday for a month. And a space for notes.

If you’d like the PDF, leave me your email address below. I’ll get it right to you.

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Hump Day Writing Prompt: Character Super Power

hump-day-writing-prompt-charater-super-powerMy work-in-progress is about a 12-year-old girl who believes she has super powers.

Her super power is problem solving. When she becomes Wonder Roo, she can figure things out at the speed of light, leap any obstacle with a single bound.

Yesterday I was thinking about how we all have our super powers. Maybe you’re really good making other people feel good about themselves. Or you make perfect hard boiled eggs (seriously, this is one of my son’s super powers. Perfect eggs, every single time.) Or you can sing like an angel. Whatever it is, it’s part of what makes you, you.

So, think about your main character and write a little today about their super power. Bonus points for figuring out your antagonist’s super power, too.

My Turn

I’ve already told you about Roona’s super power. She’s a kick-ass problem solver.

The other main character in my story is Roona’s friend and next door neighbor, Gideon.

Gideon’s super power is his ability to be rational in just about any situation. He’s the guy you want with you when you’re twelve and you decide that you have no choice but to buy a bus ticket to Las Vegas and go find your dad, who’s been missing since you were a baby. Because he’s the guy who will make sure you save enough money for the cab ride back to the bus station.

Where Roona is a doer, Gideon is a thinker.

The antagonist in Wonder Roo is Roona’s mother. She’s not bad or evil or mean. She’s sick. Roona for sure believes that her mom’s super power is her ability to bake her emotions into her cakes and pies. Her real super power is her free spirit. Miranda Mulroney knows how to have fun. She is fun.

Your Turn

Spend some time today thinking about your main character’s super power. How does their super power affect your story? Do the work, then come share it on Facebook if you want some feedback.

***

Did you know that there’s an ebook full of all the Hump Day Writing Prompts from 2016? Every Patreon Patron gets a copy–even at the $1 level! Check out the $10 level for The 100 Day MFA.

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How to be a good writer with a good life: The WRITER Framework

I have a thing about teeny, tiny goals.

They’ve changed my life, more than once.

For the last couple of months, I’ve been kicking around the idea of stacking teeny, tiny goals. I can (obviously) fit six in an hour. So, I started thinking about the things that might help me to become a more well-rounded writer and generally happy human being.

Writing and reading, of course. But also physical, mental, and emotional well-being.

Here’s what I came up with: The WRITER Framework.

WRITER stands for Writing, Reading, Ideation, Talking, Exercising, and Regrouping.

Everyday, for at least ten minutes a day, I do these things.

I write fiction.

I read fiction.

I make a list of ten ideas. (Thanks James Altucher!)

I talk to someone I don’t live with.

I exercise.

I review my day and plan for tomorrow.

The first two are all about being a writer. They’re the building blocks of your craft and if you do them everyday, even for a few minutes, you won’t be able to help improving.

The rest about the good life part of the equation.

The secret sauce.

The best thing about teeny, tiny goals is that they’re so small — it’s easier to just do them than it is to skip them. Psychologically.

An hour long goal? Not so much. You can skip an hour. No problem. So, the key is to keep the goals separate in your head. That way, if you skip your walk, or have a recluse day, you might not skip everything else.

Also, for everything on this list, ten minutes is a guilt-free minimum. Hit ten minutes and you can stop. You’re a rock star! You’ve hit your goal. Give yourself a gold star. (I mean it. Get a calendar and some star stickers. Do it up.)

But, I can almost guarantee that one day you’ll find yourself writing for an hour or you’ll take a nice long walk or fall into a great conversation with someone.

I followed the Framework everyday for a month. Here’s what happened.

I wrote nearly 19,000 words toward my new novel. (Incidentally, I also wrote on Medium everyday.)

I clearly write more than ten minutes a day. What this little goal does for me is simple. It keeps me writing every single days. There was at least one day a week over the last month where I would have just skipped writing. But, because I had this goal, I didn’t. Which is good, because I know from long experience that skipping one day leads so easily into skipping two.

I read eleven books.

I’m in an MFA program and I have to read a lot. Ten books a month. Plus, I read a poem, an essay, and a short story every day for the 1000 Day MFA program I run through Ninja Writers. So, the ten minutes a day? That represents the extra book. I read that one just for pure pleasure. In ten minutes a day. It was Blackbirds by Chuck Wendig.

I had 300 ideas! A couple of them were even good.

I came up with ideas for friends. Ideas for silly apps I’d love to have. Books I want to write. Fairy tale tropes. Ideas for a new newsletter. Ten people I want to meet and how I can do that.

One of them was James Altucher, who writes a lot about the power of writing down ten ideas a day. I asked him if he minded if I included it as the I in WRITER. He didn’t. (This counts for T, too!)

I reached out to people and some of them reached back. That was huge fun.

See above about James Altucher.

I also had coffee with Jonas Ellison. And lunch with my friend Tracy. I talked to the lady who works at the fabric counter at Wal-mart about her grandchildren. I called my sister. I talked a couple of times to my friend Amy. I talked to my ex-husband’s sister, who is also called Amy. I spoke to the other soccer moms, instead of sitting by myself feeling awkward.

I lost seven pounds.

This is about 100 percent because exercising everyday made me more mindful of what I was eating.

I started a new note keeping system and set up a writing accountability tool that I love.

I can’t believe that I’ve never heard of a Commonplace Book before. This feels like a pivotal moment. Before and after my Commonplace Book.

I wrote an ebook about this thing.

It’s the reward for patrons at the $3 level and above on the Ninja Writer Patreon account. It goes into much greater detail about each aspect of the WRITER framework and there are a couple of printables, too.

You can get it here. The past $3 awards were The Writing Planner, The Plotting Workshop eBook, and an eBook called 31 Days of Ninja Writing. You’ll get all of those, too.

Here’s a sneak peak at the printables:

If you enjoyed this post, you can:

>>Sign up for the Ninja Writers Newsletter here. (I’m on a mission!)
>>Or come hang out with the Ninjas on Facebook.
>>There are some pretty kickass rewards on our Patreon page.

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Hump Day Writing Prompt: The Name on the Sign

the-name-on-the-sign

I don’t think we’ve ever done a writing prompt that dealt with a minor character.

Minor is, of course, a relative term. There are characters in literature who aren’t the protagonist or the antagonist who absolutely make the story. Here are some classics:

  • The Wizard of Oz
  • Professor Dumbledore
  • The Mad Hatter
  • Tinkerbell
  • Mr. Tumnus

So, last night I was driving my daughter to soccer practice and I passed a sign that I see practically everyday, but never really notice. There’s an apartment (or maybe condo?) complex with a small golf course attached to it. The Trent Jones golf course.

For the first time I wondered . . . who is Trent Jones?

Here’s your challenge today. Think of a street or building or . . . golf course in your town that’s named after someone you don’t know. Then write about who that person is. Try to make them someone who might have a place in your current work-in-progress, even if you never put them in your story.

My Turn

In my story, Wonder Roo, the two main characters (Gideon and Roona) rush to a local Old Folks Home to try to retrieve a blueberry pie that Roona’s mother made while she was very sad. Roona believes that her mother bakes her emotions into her cakes and pies. When they arrive at the Old Folks Home, everyone is crying. They’re too late

#

Trent Jones is eighty-six years old. He used to be so strong. An athlete. He was a champion golfer once. The city even named a municipal golf course after him. But, he’s more frail than he used to be, since his heart attack on his eightieth birthday.

He had to move to a nursing home. It was the lowest point of his life. He’d been married for fifty-three years. He didn’t want to leave his home or his wife or his life. And then Sarah came with him. Like it wasn’t even a question. She put their house up for sale and they moved into assisted living.

He thought she probably wouldn’t have to live in the nursing home long. He went to bed every night sure that he wouldn’t wake up again. But he did. And he got better. Stronger, although he never got back to where he had been.

And then one morning, six years later, it was Sarah who didn’t wake up. His Sarah was gone.

Your Turn

Pick a person a street or building or whatever in your town is named after and write about them. But them into your story somehow, then come share it on Facebook if you want some feedback.

***

Did you know that there’s an ebook full of all the Hump Day Writing Prompts from 2016? Every Patreon Patron gets a copy–even at the $1 level! Check out the $10 level for The 100 Day MFA.

 

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Monthly Planner for Writing Accountability: An Annual FRED

In case you’re new here: FRED is the Folder for Reaching the End of your Draft. It’s an analog tool Ninjas use to keep track of their daily writing. It’s been downloaded thousands of times and is the best accountability tool I’ve ever used.

So, when I found this notebook and realized that it was essentially not only a full year FRED, but could also hold the story notes for a novel, I bought it. And it’s awesome!

The notebook is the Erin Condren Monthly Planner. It’s a lined notebook with a monthly calendar in the front.

I made you this quick video showing you how I have my annual FRED set up.

Erin Condren’s stuff is mostly VERY girlie. I picked a cover that was as gender neutral as possible, because there are Ninja Writers who maybe don’t want flowers or sparkles on their FRED. I picked the customizable quote cover.

The notebook is available here.

When you get to the site, first sign up to get your $10 discount.

Then click “Planners & Books” and then “Monthly Planners.”

From now until March 31, you can get the notebook for half off!

Here are some pictures:

Very writerly cover!

img_0707

Monthly calendar. To use it like a FRED, just give yourself a sticker everyday that you meet your writing goal. These boxes are big enough to make note of things like goals and deadlines if you want to.

img_0709

The rest of the planner is just a lined notebook. I have the first few pages set up as a log, which is the second part of the FRED. There’s one page per month. Every day I can just write the date and what work I did that day. It helps me to feel professional. It’s visual proof of how hard I’m working, which frankly, sometimes I really need.

img_0710

And then the rest of the lined pages, I’m really excited about. It’s just the right size to use to plan a novel using The Plotting Workshop. The story I’m writing right now, I already plotted in another notebook, but in a month or two I’ll be ready to start working on the next story and I’m going to just plan it right in here.

The paper is high quality and nice to write on, by the way.

img_0711

Okay, also, I made this little printable PDF thing for you. You can print it, use double-sided tape to stick the two sides together, then laminate it. I tell my printer to print it in A5 size. The lamination makes it so that you can use a dry erase marker (or wet erase, so it won’t smear. That’s what I do.) to keep track of your writing progress.

I use mine as a bookmark.

One side has a sort of bar chart thing you can fill in for a week. (Make sure the plastic is totally dry after you clean it before you write on it, or you get wonky letters!)

img_0713

And the other side has a chart where you can write down your word count everyday for a month. And a space for notes.

img_0714

If you’d like the PDF, just click here and leave me your email address. I’ll get it right to you.

 

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Hump Day Writing Prompt: Visual Inspiration

hump-day-writing-promptToday’s Hump Day Writing Prompt has two parts.

Go online and do an image search for a picture that speaks to you about your story. It doesn’t have to be a perfect fit. Just look around until something grabs you.

Then write the story behind the picture. Think about what’s outside the frame.

My Turn

I came across this picture in a post on Daily Mail about a photographer who documented a Florida roller rink in the 1970s. It made me think about my main character’s parents. Roona is very attached to her roller skates, throughout my story. What if the reason why is that the only picture she has of her father is this one, where he’s at a rink with her mother and they’re young and happy and obviously in love?

Moment in time: Photographer Bill Yates spent from the autumn of 1972 to the summer of 1973 taking snaps inside the Sweetheart Rink

(Like I said, the picture doesn’t have to be perfect. My story happens in Nevada, not Florida. And the people that this picture made me think about weren’t born until the 1980s.)

Roona sat on her bed, wedged in the corner with her knees pulled up to her chin. She opened her copy of The Hobbit, the one with her mother’s name written in pencil on the first page, and took out the picture. She’d had it for almost a year and so far she’d been able to keep it secret. She ran her finger over her father’s face. She knew it was her dad because her mom had written “Curtis and Miranda, 1999” on the back with a marker. She’d never seen her mom look as happy as she was in the picture. If she’d baked cookies that day, good luck and laughter would have bubbled up in anyone who ate one, like ginger ale bubbles.

Your Turn

Find a picture and write about it, then come share it on Facebook if you want some feedback.

***

Did you know that there’s an ebook full of all the Hump Day Writing Prompts from 2016? Every Patreon Patron gets a copy–even at the $1 level! Check out the $10 level for The 100 Day MFA.

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Hump Day Writing Prompt: Make a List

hump-day-writing-prompt-make-a-list

Yesterday I came across this idea online that if you make a list of 10 ideas a day, you’ll turn yourself into an idea machine. (Look out for Sunday’s newsletter. I’ll share that link. If it’s past Sunday, check out the archives for The NW #12.)

That got me thinking. Wouldn’t thinking about our characters’ ideas be a great exercise?

So today’s prompt is to make a list of 10 ideas. They can be anything. Except a to-do list. A to-do list doesn’t count.

Here are 10 ideas for your 10 list:

  1. 10 favorite books.
  2. 10 ways to solve a problem.
  3. 10 favorite cartoon characters.
  4. 10 people they’ve hurt, and how to make amends.
  5. 10 people they’d kiss.
  6. 10 things they could do to fall asleep at night.
  7. 10 crazy inventions.
  8. 10 jobs they wish they had.
  9. 10 dogs they’ve known.
  10. 10 bad habits they want to break.

Really, it can be anything. This should be fun! I can’t wait to see what you come up with.

My Turn:

I’m working on a middle grade book called Wonder Roo. The story is told by Gideon, but it’s really about his next door neighbor, Roona. Roona is a 12-year-old girl who may or may not be magic. She believes that her old baby blanket makes her Wonder Roo and that her mother bakes her emotions into the goodies she sells–and passes them on to the people to eat them. It’s hard for Gideon to argue with what he sees.

Here’s Roona’s list of 10 ways to survive middle school.

  1. Keep my blanket in my backpack.
  2. Save some good-mood cookies in the freezer, for emergencies.
  3. Make sure Mom doesn’t bring cupcakes for my birthday. (Especially if the frosting is blue.)
  4. Find the library. Pronto.
  5. Wear striped socks.
  6. Use Wonder Roo in emergencies.
  7. Make friends.
  8. Pay attention.
  9. Join the soccer team.
  10. Be brave.

Your Turn:

Write your character’s 10 list and come share it on Facebook if you want some feedback.

***

Did you know that there’s an ebook full of all the Hump Day Writing Prompts from 2016? Every Patreon Patron gets a copy–even at the $1 level! Check out the $10 level for The 1000 Day MFA.

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Hump Day Writing Prompt: Character Fidgets

hump-day-writing-prompt-character-fidgets

Last week my husband bought something called a fidget cube. It’s basically just a cube with different fidgety things on each of the six sides. I feel like this is a particularly apt quirk for Kevin, because he’s a craps dealer. He spends a lot of time with dice in his hand.

Image result for fidget cube

So, the fidget cube made me start thinking about character fidgets.

I don’t know about you, but I find myself having EVERY character do a lot of shifting weight from foot to foot or nodding or pacing or smiling. My characters smile a lot. When they’re happy, when they’re sad, when they’re nervous. They’re smiley people.

So smiley that I have to search for smiles in my finished manuscripts and tone them down.

Everyone has a fidget. Something they do when they have to do something. I spin a pin between my fingers. I know a girl with the (terrible) habit of chewing on the ends of her hair. My husband, when he isn’t fidgeting with his new cube, rubs the bridge of his nose, even though he hasn’t worn glasses in fifteen years.

Fidgets do a couple of important things in fiction.

They’re beats.

While you want to be careful about having your protagonist bite their thumbnail on every page of your book, a fidget can be a good way to pace your dialogue. It forces the reader to stop for a second, the way your character might.

They provide character insight.

Why does your protagonist rub at their lower back or whistle under their breath? Is it a tell? Maybe they only do it when they’re lying or feeling guilty or hiding a juicy secret.

This week’s prompt:

Write a scene that includes a character’s fidget. It can be your protagonist, but I think that even minor characters can be deepened by having some sort of tell (if it moves the story forward.)

My Example:

(The fidget is highlighted.)

Mom wouldn’t let me leave the house without eating breakfast and she wouldn’t let me go to anyone’s house, not even our next door neighbor’s, before nine a.m. After I got dressed and ate some banana bread, I sat at the kitchen table fully dressed, with my shoes on, drumming at the table with my fingers, watching the clock tick slowly, slowly from 8:34 to 9:00.

The instant it did, I went into my parents’ bedroom. “Can I go to Roona’s?”

“Your room,” Mom said.

“I promise to finish it after lunch.” I looked at Dad. “Please?”

It was his first day at his new job. He was going to work in marketing at a big casino on the outskirts of the most outskirt town in the world. He adjusted his tie and said, “Your whole room unpacked by the time I get home from work sounds great to me.”

“I don’t know about my whole room,” I said.

He held out his hands, like it wasn’t up to him, then pointed his forefingers at me. “It was your plan, Boss. Have fun with Roona this morning, then get to work.”

Mom lifted her eyebrows and I said, “Okay, fine.”

“Can I go?” Harper asked from the bedroom door. “I want to go.”

“No way.”

“Mooom! I want to go with Gideon.”

“I need your help here, Harper.”

Harper pouted and I left while I had the chance.

***

Your turn, Ninja! Write your scene and come share it on Facebook if you want some feedback.

***

Did you know that there’s an ebook full of all the Hump Day Writing Prompts from 2016? Every Patreon Patron gets a copy–even at the $1 level! Check out the $10 level for The 1000 Day MFA.

 

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Hump Day Writing Prompt: Home Base

hump-day-writing-prompt

Did you ever play tag when you were a kid?

Remember how there was always some spot that was home base? A tree. A bike. Someone’s mom.

If you got home, you were safe.

For today’s writing prompt, think about the concept of home–deeper and bigger than a house. (Although, where they live might also be their home base.)

If you really want to dig into your story, do this assignment for your hero AND your antagonist. Just think about where they’d run to, if they were being chased. It might be somewhere internal. A memory, maybe? It might be a person. It might be a physical place.

Write a paragraph or two describing your protagonist’s (and antagonist’s if you have time) safe place. Use all your senses.

***

I’m working on a middle grade story right now called Wonder Roo. My narrator is a boy named Gideon. He’s telling the story of his neighbor, though–a quirky girl named Roona.

Roona’s home base is a thing. Her baby blanket. She believes that being wrapped in it during a house fire when she was a baby saved her life–and that when she wraps it around her neck, cape style, it turns her into Wonder Roo.

It’s a very plain blanket. Soft pink, lightweight cotton with an open weave and a satin binding. After twelve years of all kinds of use, it’s very worn. Her blanket is also her only real connection to her father, who she believes joined the Air Force soon after the fire when she was a baby. She hasn’t seen him since.

Here’s the scene where Roona first shows up in the story, with her blanket:

What caught my attention though, and yanked me right out of my sourness, was everything else about her. She wore cut-off jeans and a white t-shirt. Pretty standard stuff.

She had rainbow-striped socks pulled up to her knobby knees and roller skates that looked like blue and yellow running shoes strapped to her feet. And over her clothes, she wore a red swimsuit with a stripe running down each side. She had something tied around her neck, flapping in the hot, dry breeze as she skated in slow circles on her porch.

“What in the . . .” Despite myself, I was curious enough to open the car door and step my first foot in Ne-va-da.

“See, there’s a kid next door,” Dad said, rubbing my head as he passed me. “You’re going to be fine.”

This story doesn’t have a villain. The antagonist is Roona’s mother–more specifically her mental illness. Or the way she is now. Her home is an activity. Miranda Mulroney is a baker on a soul level. Roona believes that her emotions get baked into her cakes and pies and passed on to the people who eat them.

When things get hard for Miranda, she bakes. She stays up all night losing herself in her ability to turn out perfect cookies or scones. It’s the thing she turns to when nothing else makes sense.

Your turn, Ninja! Write your scene and come share it on Facebook if you want some feedback.

***

Did you know that there’s an ebook full of all the Hump Day Writing Prompts from 2016? Every Patreon Patron gets a copy–even at the $1 level! Check out the $10 level for The 1000 Day MFA.

 

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Hump Day Writing Prompt: Use the Right Words

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In a 1895 essay called “Fenimore Cooper’s Literary Offenses,” Mark Twain listed as one of his rules that writers “use the right word, not its second cousin.”

More than 120 years later and “Use the right word, not its second cousin” is still excellent advice. (There’s a whole book of essays on writing by Mark Twain, by the way.)

We can so easily get caught up in choosing perfect words that we stop forward motion on our stories. I’m just going to come right out and say that if you have to pull out a thesaurus to find the word, you’re probably courting a second cousin.

And you don’t want to do that. I have a feeling it’s frowned upon even more now than it was at the end of the nineteenth century. In every possible interpretation.

Choosing the right word is also key in the showing vs. telling battle.

In the same essay, Twain writes, “When a person has a poor ear for music he will flat and sharp right along without knowing it. He keeps near the tune, but it is not the tune. When a person has a poor ear for words, the result is a literary flatting and sharping; you perceive what he is intending to say, but you also perceive that he doesn’t say it.”

Let’s work on tuning our ear for words today.

Write a scene where your protagonist is frustrated. Use your word choice to show the frustration without coming out and telling the reader how the main character is feeling.

Here’s an example from my work-in-progress, a middle grade story called Wonder Roo. 

Sometime during our endless drive through the state of Tennessee, I decided that I would never, not ever, forgive my parents for dragging me to live in some dirt town in rural Nevada.

Not Nev-ah-da. Nev-a-da. (A-like-in-apple right in the middle.) Better learn to say it like a native, Dad said, or they’ll make you move to California.

Whatever. I didn’t want to be a native of Nev-a-da or Nev-ah-da or anywhere but Wildwood, New-Jer-sey.

“You’re pouting so hard, Josiah, I can hear it.” Dad tilted the rear view mirror so he saw me through it. I barely suppressed the urge to stick out my tongue.

“Will we be in Tennessee forever or what?” I asked.

He flicked on the blinker and slowed, swerving toward the shoulder. “Would you like to be?”

I scrunched in my seat, arms crossed over my chest. “No.”

“You’re sure? I bet we could find a circus around here somewhere who’d buy you cheap.”

“Dad!”

“So,” he lifted one shoulder like it didn’t matter to him one way or the other, “you want to keep going?”

“Yes.”

“Right-o, Boss.” He shot me a little salute and somehow turned things around so that continuing this long, long drive west in a SUV pulling a trailer full of our stuff was my idea.

My sister Harper leaned forward in her booster seat and said, “Hey, Josiah’s not the boss. I’m the boss!”

Mom made a little sound suspiciously like a laugh and I turned my scowl out the window and waited to get to Arkansas.

Your turn, Ninja! Write your scene and come share it on Facebook if you want some feedback.

***

Did you know that there’s an ebook full of all the Hump Day Writing Prompts from 2016? Every Patreon Patron gets a copy–even at the $1 level! Check out the $10 level for The 1000 Day MFA.

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