Hump Day Writing Prompt: Collecting Nouns

hump-day-writing-prompt-collect-nouns

I am on a major Ray Bradbury kick lately. I made a little mini-zine for Patreon patrons using my favorite Bradbury quote. Part of that quote is my 2017 motto. I just finished reading Zen in the Art of Writing for the third or fourth time (It’s so good. If you haven’t read it, remedy that right now, please.) AND I’m reading a short story from Bradbury Stories every day for 100 days (there are 100 stories.)

Also, I’m taking his advice and writing a short story every week this year.

Whew.

So, since I have Bradbury on the brain, I thought I’d share one of his brilliant ideas for coming up with story ideas.

Collect nouns. Bradbury kept a list of them, and if you read either (or both!) of the books above, you’ll see how that worked out for him. He talks a lot in Zen in the Art of Writing about how his nouns lead to some of the stories in Bradbury Stories.

Here’s what he has to say about it:

These lists were the provocations, finally, that caused my better stuff to surface. I was feeling my way toward something honest, hidden under the trapdoor on the top of my skull.

The lists ran something like this:

THE LAKE. THE NIGHT. THE CRICKETS. THE RAVINE. THE ATTIC. THE BASEMENT. THE TRAPDOOR. THE BABY. THE CROWD. THE NIGHT TRAIN. THE FOG HORN. THE SCYTHE. THE CARNIVAL. THE CAROUSEL. THE DWARF. THE MIRROR MAZE. THE SKELETON.

So, this week’s Hump Day Writing Prompt is to open your notebook to a fresh page and start your own collection of nouns. Start thinking about things that creeped you out when you were eight. Things that you come across at the weirdest times. What you got for Christmas last year.

I was at my county’s Democratic Committee meeting last night and found myself making a list of related nouns in my notebook: Energy, name tag, candidate, committeeman, sign, winner, loser, canvassing, campaign, clock, low-level official, constituents.

I have no idea if those will ever go anywhere, but having a nice, fat collection feels good.

Extra credit: Take one of your nouns and brainstorm on it. Open it up and see what comes out. I’ll use committeeman as an example. I like the word. It has a good mouth feel. And it sounds a little absurd, which makes it excellent, story-wise.

What is a committeeman: Very low-level local politician. He’s the one who gets an earful, because he’s barely one step above a citizen and he’s there.

What does a committeeman do: He votes in more important people. He tries to tell those people what his constituents (their constituents) want, but is usually unsuccessful. He tries to get people in his precinct registered to vote and then get them in the voting booth.

Would I want to write about a committeeman in the past, present, or future: Not past. Present would be interesting, since politics are so tense right now. Future might be interesting, too. What would a committeeman 100 years from now do? It would be an interesting way to think about the future of current ultra-divisive politics.

So, what’s my idea? A story about a committeeman in the future, with a focus on the fall out of utterly divisive politics. Maybe my committeeman finds himself caught in a feud between next door neighbors–one on the right, one on the left.

Your turn, Ninja! Start your collection of nouns today. And if you’re feeling energetic, stretch one out into a short story idea.

Come on over and share some of your nouns with us on Facebook.

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Did you know that there’s an ebook full of all the Hump Day Writing Prompts from 2016? Every Patreon Patron gets a copy–even at the $1 level!

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